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Monday, April 14

  1. page Fin Whale edited ... Where do they live? Fin whales can be found in every major ocean and open sea on Earth. Due t…
    ...
    Where do they live?
    Fin whales can be found in every major ocean and open sea on Earth. Due to seasonal changes and temperature changes in the water, some populations will migrate from one location to another based on what time of the year it is. In the water, the whales tend to live in depths of about 200 to 250 meters.
    {https://lh4.googleusercontent.com/sGrtDArUFmGI6c5pDMgZLmylpYwmvrphpDLsP_mvuGh9GOzP5snpbkW-psW4jltnl_umnWBWvdj7oOL5X8ySeA4TKSz6AtgdbIMgoNu-4zdqVHW6ormhaKkJOYsJhZsQHQ}
    The
    The yellow area
    ...
    of fin whales.
    __http://maps.iucnredlist.org/map.html?id=2478__
    whales.__http://maps.iucnredlist.org/map.html?id=2478__
    How many are left?
    Currently, it is believed that there are between 50,000 and 90,000 fin whales left in our oceans.
    {https://lh5.googleusercontent.com/wO9cS4nhV43xjlNqnmKMMwUwwLsOeEqxEMOyDUtOfXmzxwBanFGWdDwtCwJjP-KxqshdP5znvze-8bbt-JHAuiIBkZ3oYPE1tz24_7G54-RpiD9rK5kjoMT_IBWCP-vYng}
    http://worldwildlife.org/species/fin-whale
    http://worldwildlife.org/species/fin-whale
    Why are they endangered?
    Human threats have been and still are the number one reason why fin whales and many other species of whales are becoming endangered. Whaling is the main reason why humans have had an effect on whale populations. When humans first started hunting them many years ago, they were used for survival as a source of food, fuel, and building materials. In modern times, they are primarily killed for oil and blubber. Between 1935 and 1965, at least 30,000 fin whales were being slaughtered every year; in total, 723,000. As technology advanced in regards to radar and hunting tools, more and more fin whales have been killed and sold around the world; primarily to Japanese markets. Humans have also limited the growth in populations of fin whales by interrupting their mating rituals. Since male fin whales use low frequency sounds to attract female fin whales, mating can be prevented by human-produced sound waves such as military sonar and seismic surveys. Fishing gear can also be blamed for the endangerment of fin whales. There is at least one reported fin whale death each year caused by entanglement in fishing equipment. Humans have been and still are the main reason for why the fin whale has become an endangered species and only humans are able to make the necessary changes to restore population counts.
    {https://lh5.googleusercontent.com/rSd-JfFLC5AfXq-HrGSTXf8fz7c8-h_ZuWk6FnaAhZQ5NNFVsfNXCmoZZgqpRhDzsAjkf4y45fVLyNZtX7wmwrD7hqy2_pG8SnsvQSUh1LPNJtuucrdNPZnsSvdgp2eI4w}
    Fin
    Fin whale carcass being processed
    __http://www.arkive.org/fin-whale/balaenoptera-physalus/image-G125781.html__
    processed__http://www.arkive.org/fin-whale/balaenoptera-physalus/image-G125781.html__
    {https://lh5.googleusercontent.com/bhTUBd3pMtnl_NczHp3NwAV6NFmeqAkS0a-U6TwdngieBVbQ4037JJAKXq2doggrv7fPAyaoHC8SeqRtWLCJnbnhE7JCuEKlnBg0nJK7qJOPwdKuzm_La7SruWKVtuCt0g}
    Fin
    Fin whale being
    ...
    a whaling station
    __http://www.arkive.org/fin-whale/balaenoptera-physalus/image-G143910.html__
    station__http://www.arkive.org/fin-whale/balaenoptera-physalus/image-G143910.html__
    What is being done to prevent extinction?
    *International Whaling Commission
    ...
    http://www.npolar.no/en/species/fin-whale.html
    http://www.orcaweb.org.uk/species-sightings/fin-whale
    {https://lh4.googleusercontent.com/SHAFaomej7oVWTEGiC98sjzqGnuBC5sBp2-Y8BC9cMeZeAup2BckUVuJiAVx8kqvVGg5WGCGNqDz8B20h2FSI9IOWw09QGbkrtkr4eNDYINv2qYqxivIqBYcxKZapEhbaA}
    __http://www.arkive.org/fin-whale/balaenoptera-physalus/image-G143914.html__
    __http://www.arkive.org/fin-whale/balaenoptera-physalus/image-G143914.html__
    Works Cited
    "Balaenoptera Physalus." Animal Diversity Web. N.p., n.d. Web. 14 Apr. 2014.
    (view changes)
    9:36 pm
  2. page Fin Whale edited Fin Whale Balaenoptera physalus Jordan Lawlor {https://lh6.googleusercontent.com/NovfQJZ8hXDX71…
    Fin Whale
    Balaenoptera physalus
    Jordan Lawlor
    {https://lh6.googleusercontent.com/NovfQJZ8hXDX71dMg-j6Iry-LnE651F0EMOO24VoKwhTcwcyJ8qrWqVPJ0QJQ-RLbUmoAAC1EQMOosTDJPR-Gp-B0zilnSZk-E1gT8cOYf_6ef4pAgf-Xe21fahinXV0sw}
    __http://www.arkive.org/fin-whale/balaenoptera-physalus/image-G133539.html__
    Kingdom - Animalia
    Phylum - Chordata
    Clade - Mammalia
    Order - Cetartiodactyla
    Family - Balaenopteridae
    Genus - Balaenoptera
    Species - B. physalus
    Typically, a fin whale will grow to be 20 meters long and will weigh around 70,000 kilograms. These large numbers are what gives the fin whale its title as the second largest mammal on Earth, right behind the blue whale. Although, they could be larger or smaller depending on where they live (i.e., Arctic fin whales can be 25 meters in length). With fin whales, gender does not determine the size of the organism. On average, the male and female whales are roughly the same size. They have a flat head that accounts for around one fifth of the whales body weight. While migrating, they tend to be in groups of six to 10 members. A normal fin whale is able to dive up to 250 meters down into the ocean and can stay at that depth for 15 minutes. In order to get the necessary nutrients to survive, fin whales use filter feeding to ingest fish, aquatic crustaceans, marine invertebrates, and zooplankton.
    Where do they live?
    Fin whales can be found in every major ocean and open sea on Earth. Due to seasonal changes and temperature changes in the water, some populations will migrate from one location to another based on what time of the year it is. In the water, the whales tend to live in depths of about 200 to 250 meters.
    {https://lh4.googleusercontent.com/sGrtDArUFmGI6c5pDMgZLmylpYwmvrphpDLsP_mvuGh9GOzP5snpbkW-psW4jltnl_umnWBWvdj7oOL5X8ySeA4TKSz6AtgdbIMgoNu-4zdqVHW6ormhaKkJOYsJhZsQHQ}
    The yellow area represents the current distribution of fin whales.
    __http://maps.iucnredlist.org/map.html?id=2478__
    How many are left?
    Currently, it is believed that there are between 50,000 and 90,000 fin whales left in our oceans.
    {https://lh5.googleusercontent.com/wO9cS4nhV43xjlNqnmKMMwUwwLsOeEqxEMOyDUtOfXmzxwBanFGWdDwtCwJjP-KxqshdP5znvze-8bbt-JHAuiIBkZ3oYPE1tz24_7G54-RpiD9rK5kjoMT_IBWCP-vYng}
    http://worldwildlife.org/species/fin-whale
    Why are they endangered?
    Human threats have been and still are the number one reason why fin whales and many other species of whales are becoming endangered. Whaling is the main reason why humans have had an effect on whale populations. When humans first started hunting them many years ago, they were used for survival as a source of food, fuel, and building materials. In modern times, they are primarily killed for oil and blubber. Between 1935 and 1965, at least 30,000 fin whales were being slaughtered every year; in total, 723,000. As technology advanced in regards to radar and hunting tools, more and more fin whales have been killed and sold around the world; primarily to Japanese markets. Humans have also limited the growth in populations of fin whales by interrupting their mating rituals. Since male fin whales use low frequency sounds to attract female fin whales, mating can be prevented by human-produced sound waves such as military sonar and seismic surveys. Fishing gear can also be blamed for the endangerment of fin whales. There is at least one reported fin whale death each year caused by entanglement in fishing equipment. Humans have been and still are the main reason for why the fin whale has become an endangered species and only humans are able to make the necessary changes to restore population counts.
    {https://lh5.googleusercontent.com/rSd-JfFLC5AfXq-HrGSTXf8fz7c8-h_ZuWk6FnaAhZQ5NNFVsfNXCmoZZgqpRhDzsAjkf4y45fVLyNZtX7wmwrD7hqy2_pG8SnsvQSUh1LPNJtuucrdNPZnsSvdgp2eI4w}
    Fin whale carcass being processed
    __http://www.arkive.org/fin-whale/balaenoptera-physalus/image-G125781.html__
    {https://lh5.googleusercontent.com/bhTUBd3pMtnl_NczHp3NwAV6NFmeqAkS0a-U6TwdngieBVbQ4037JJAKXq2doggrv7fPAyaoHC8SeqRtWLCJnbnhE7JCuEKlnBg0nJK7qJOPwdKuzm_La7SruWKVtuCt0g}
    Fin whale being butchered at a whaling station
    __http://www.arkive.org/fin-whale/balaenoptera-physalus/image-G143910.html__
    What is being done to prevent extinction?
    *International Whaling Commission
    *Passing laws that either limit the number of whales that are able to be caught annually or ban the hunting of whales entirely.
    *Enforcing the laws that are going into effect that help protect the fin whale and other species.
    *Donations to organizations that are trying to put an end to the endangerment of animals (i.e., the International Whaling Commission and the World Wildlife Foundation)
    To find out more, visit…
    http://www.marinemammalscience.org/index.php?option=com_content&view=article&id=418&Itemid=279
    http://uk.whales.org/species-guide/fin-whale
    http://www.npolar.no/en/species/fin-whale.html
    http://www.orcaweb.org.uk/species-sightings/fin-whale
    {https://lh4.googleusercontent.com/SHAFaomej7oVWTEGiC98sjzqGnuBC5sBp2-Y8BC9cMeZeAup2BckUVuJiAVx8kqvVGg5WGCGNqDz8B20h2FSI9IOWw09QGbkrtkr4eNDYINv2qYqxivIqBYcxKZapEhbaA}
    __http://www.arkive.org/fin-whale/balaenoptera-physalus/image-G143914.html__
    Works Cited
    "Balaenoptera Physalus." Animal Diversity Web. N.p., n.d. Web. 14 Apr. 2014.
    "Balaenoptera Physalus." (Common Rorqual, Finback, Fin-backed Whale, Finner, Fin Whale, Herring
    Whale, Razorback). N.p., n.d. Web. 14 Apr. 2014.
    "Fin Whale | Species & Sightings | ORCA - Looking out for Whales and Dolphins." Sitename. N.p., n.d. Web.
    14 Apr. 2014.
    "Fin Whale (Balaenoptera Physalus)." Fin Whale Videos, Photos and Facts. N.p., n.d. Web. 14 Apr. 2014.
    "Fin Whale (Balaenoptera Physalus)." Norwegian Polar Institute. N.p., n.d. Web. 14 Apr. 2014.
    "Fin Whale." WDC, Whale and Dolphin Conservation. N.p., n.d. Web. 14 Apr. 2014.
    "Society for Marine Mammalogy." - Fin Whale (B. Physalus). N.p., n.d. Web. 14 Apr. 2014.
    WorldWildlife.org. World Wildlife Fund, n.d. Web. 14 Apr. 2014.

    (view changes)
    9:33 pm
  3. page Red Wolf edited ... Unfortunately, the species was becoming increasingly dispersed and population numbers were dwi…
    ...
    Unfortunately, the species was becoming increasingly dispersed and population numbers were dwindling. In 1980, the last 17 red wolves were placed into an intense recovery program and the species was declared extinct in the wild.
    However, the species was reintroduced into the wild in 1987 and the red wolf now inhibits a five-county range in North Carolina. As of 2003, there are approximately 100 red wolves living in the wild that reside in about 20 different families/packs.
    The habitatHabitats of the
    {http://www.fws.gov/redwolf/Images/RW%20historic%20range%20map%202.jpg} Former Red Wolf Range {http://www.fws.gov/redwolf/Images/5_county_nc_med.JPG} Current Red Wolf Range
    Photo Source (both from the same source):
    (view changes)
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  4. page Red Wolf edited ... http://i.imgur.com/iWEgb.jpg Description ... colored coat that has with touches of The…
    ...
    http://i.imgur.com/iWEgb.jpg
    Description
    ...
    colored coat that haswith touches of
    The breeding season for red wolves starts in January and ends in March. During that time, a female wolf will give birth to a litter anywhere from two to eight pups, although the average is three to six pups. The pups will stay with their parents for 15 - 20 months, and then they will leave the pack. The lifespan for red wolves in the wild is about 7 - 8 years, although they have been known to live up to 15 years in captivity.
    {http://cdn2.arkive.org/media/FF/FF815572-09AE-4CDA-A84A-98EA2403B52D/Presentation.Large/Newborn-red-wolf-pups.jpg} Red Wolf Newborn Pups {http://cdn2.arkive.org/media/F3/F3143AF6-D4C9-48EC-8CDD-9FD69B9CE3EB/Presentation.Large/Red-wolf-pup.jpg} Red Wolf Pup {http://cdn2.arkive.org/media/83/83B5327D-6D59-4CD6-9F7B-0878F7A9047C/Presentation.Large/Red-wold-lying-down.jpg} Adult Red Wolf
    ...
    Unfortunately, the species was becoming increasingly dispersed and population numbers were dwindling. In 1980, the last 17 red wolves were placed into an intense recovery program and the species was declared extinct in the wild.
    However, the species was reintroduced into the wild in 1987 and the red wolf now inhibits a five-county range in North Carolina. As of 2003, there are approximately 100 red wolves living in the wild that reside in about 20 different families/packs.
    ...
    red wolf ranges includes swamps,
    {http://www.fws.gov/redwolf/Images/RW%20historic%20range%20map%202.jpg} Former Red Wolf Range {http://www.fws.gov/redwolf/Images/5_county_nc_med.JPG} Current Red Wolf Range
    Photo Source (both from the same source):
    (view changes)
    8:05 pm
  5. page Mammals edited ... Borneo Bay Cat Eurasian Otter __**Fin Whale**__ Fin Whale Galapagos Sea Lion Giant Arma…
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    Borneo Bay Cat
    Eurasian Otter
    __**Fin Whale**__Fin Whale
    Galapagos Sea Lion
    Giant Armadillo
    (view changes)
    6:28 pm
  6. page Mammals edited ... Borneo Bay Cat Eurasian Otter Fin Whale __**Fin Whale**__ Galapagos Sea Lion Giant Arma…
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    Borneo Bay Cat
    Eurasian Otter
    Fin Whale__**Fin Whale**__
    Galapagos Sea Lion
    Giant Armadillo
    (view changes)
    6:27 pm
  7. page Boulder Star Coral edited ... {Boulder-star-coral-ready-to-spawn.jpg} Boulder Star Coral Preparing to Spawn Like many other…
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    {Boulder-star-coral-ready-to-spawn.jpg} Boulder Star Coral Preparing to Spawn
    Like many other coral species, Boulder Star coral is zooxanthellate. This simply means that its tissues contain large numbers of single-celled algae called zooxanthellae. The two organisms have a symbiotic relationship in which the algae have a stable environment within the coral's tissues while the coral receives nutrients photosynthesized by the algae! Although this symbiotic relationship allows the coral to harness the suns energy to create vast reef structures, it is limited to living close to the water's surface to optimize light intake. The Boulder Star coral relies on the zooxanthellae for about 70 percent of its energy, it can also feed on plankton via the multitude of polyps that make up the majority of the coral.
    ...
    for fertilization. {Boulder-star-coral-releasing-bundles-of-sperm-and-eggs.jpg}
    {Boulder-star-coral-releasing-bundles-of-sperm-and-eggs.jpg}
    Releasing Sperm
    The coral is found at depths of up to 20 meters but is most abundant from 1 to 10 meters. It is mostly found in semi-protected reef environments such as well as lagoons and upper reef slopes.
    {Boulder-star-coral.jpg} Coral!
    Endangerment {status_en_on.gif}
    About====About a third
    ...
    Star Coral
    ==

    Being placed on Appendix II of CITES makes it illegal to trade the Boulder Star coral without a permit. Many recommendations have been made to further research this beautiful creature for more possible conservation actions.
    Boulder Star Coral Spawning:
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